Jordan law

Within the changing framework of the cyber world is the dangerous world of cyber crime. Thus, it is imperative for judicial authorities world-wide to formulate laws and keep its laws updated in order to protect the public’s cyber security. The Jordanian government has recently approved a new and stringent cyber crime law. Jordan’s “Information Systems Crime Law of 2010” contains 18 articles dealing with the complete spectrum of cyber crime. Articles in said law have defined acts of cyber crime across the whole continuum, dealing with minor offenses such as unauthorized access to computer material, to more serious crimes such as identity and credit card fraud. The major Articles of Jordan’s “Information Systems Crime Law of 2010”are as follows:

In August, in response to the criticism from international and domestic human rights and
media activists, the government approved a temporary Law on ‘Information Systems
Crimes’, the so-called ‘Cyber Crimes Law’, amending several provisions of the legislation
which undermined the freedom of online media by making news websites vulnerable to
prosecutions and lawsuits.
The major Articles of Jordan’s “Information Systems Crime Law of 2010”are as follows:
– Article 3(a): The unauthorized access to law protected computer information without lawful authority, in the form of internet websites, or information systems, is punishable by jail for a period of no less than 1 week to 3 months, and/or payment of a fine of no less than 100 to 200 Jordanian dinars.
– Article 3(b): Whoever in a circumstance described in subsection (a) of Article 3 knowingly and without lawful authority, gains unauthorized access to law protected computer information resulting in the distortion, erasing, destroying of computer information, or the illegal copying of said information, is punishable by jail for a period of no less than 3 months to 1 year and/or payment of a fine of no less than 200 to 1000 Jordanian dinars.
– Article 4: The production, use and distribution of electronic computer programs that results in to gain unauthorized access to law protected computer information, resulting in the distortion, erasing of said information, or the illegal copying of said information is punishable by jail for a period of no less than 3 months to 1 year and/or payment of a fine of no less than 200 to 1000 Jordanian dinars.
– Article 6(a): The unauthorized access, through information systems of credit card information, or documents pertaining to financial and e-banking records is punishable by jail for a period of no less than 3 months to 2 years and/or payment of a fine of 500 to 2000 Jordanian dinars.
– Article 6 (b): Whoever in a circumstance described in subsection (a) of Article 6 intentionally gains unauthorized access through information systems, of credit card information, or documents pertaining to financial and e-banking records, knowingly with intention to defraud, or retrieve information relating to monetary and banking transactions is punishable by jail for a period of no less than 1 year and/or payment of a fine of no less than 1000 to 5000 Jordanian dinars.
– Article 9 (a): The distribution, or sending of explicit content or content against public morality, relating to or affecting persons under age 18, is punishable by payment of a fine of no less than 300 to 5000 Jordanian dinars.
– Article 9 (b): The use of information systems to exploit, sell, distribute, produce of explicit content or promote content against public morality, or the prostitution, or coercion into performing explicit acts of persons under age 18 is punishable by jail for a period of no less than 1 year and/or payment of a fine of no less than 1000 to 5000 Jordanian Dinars.
– Article 11: The use of information systems to promote terrorist ideology, or the use of such systems to contact groups of known terrorist activity is punishable by hard labor.
– Article 12 (a): The use of information systems to obtain legally protected content pertaining to the national security, public safety, national defense, or content pertaining to the foreign relations or economy of the kingdom of Jordan is punishable by jail for a period of no less than 4 months and/or a fine of no less than 500 to 5000 Jordanian Dinars.

– Article 3(a): The unauthorized access to law protected computer information without lawful authority, in the form of internet websites, or information systems, is punishable by jail for a period of no less than 1 week to 3 months, and/or payment of a fine of no less than 100 to 200 Jordanian dinars.

– Article 3(b): Whoever in a circumstance described in subsection (a) of Article 3 knowingly and without lawful authority, gains unauthorized access to law protected computer information resulting in the distortion, erasing, destroying of computer information, or the illegal copying of said information, is punishable by jail for a period of no less than 3 months to 1 year and/or payment of a fine of no less than 200 to 1000 Jordanian dinars.

– Article 4: The production, use and distribution of electronic computer programs that results in to gain unauthorized access to law protected computer information, resulting in the distortion, erasing of said information, or the illegal copying of said information is punishable by jail for a period of no less than 3 months to 1 year and/or payment of a fine of no less than 200 to 1000 Jordanian dinars.

Internet Financial Fraud:

– Article 6(a): The unauthorized access, through information systems of credit card information, or documents pertaining to financial and e-banking records is punishable by jail for a period of no less than 3 months to 2 years and/or payment of a fine of 500 to 2000 Jordanian dinars.

– Article 6 (b): Whoever in a circumstance described in subsection (a) of Article 6 intentionally gains unauthorized access through information systems, of credit card information, or documents pertaining to financial and e-banking records, knowingly with intention to defraud, or retrieve information relating to monetary and banking transactions is punishable by jail for a period of no less than 1 year and/or payment of a fine of no less than 1000 to 5000 Jordanian dinars.

Obstruction of Public Morality:

– Article 9 (a): The distribution, or sending of explicit content or content against public morality, relating to or affecting persons under age 18, is punishable by payment of a fine of no less than 300 to 5000 Jordanian dinars.

– Article 9 (b): The use of information systems to exploit, sell, distribute, produce of explicit content or promote content against public morality, or the prostitution, or coercion into performing explicit acts of persons under age 18 is punishable by jail for a period of no less than 1 year and/or payment of a fine of no less than 1000 to 5000 Jordanian Dinars.

National Security and Terrorism:

– Article 11: The use of information systems to promote terrorist ideology, or the use of such systems to contact groups of known terrorist activity is punishable by hard labor.

– Article 12 (a): The use of information systems to obtain legally protected content pertaining to the national security, public safety, national defense, or content pertaining to the foreign relations or economy of the kingdom of Jordan is punishable by jail for a period of no less than 4 months and/or a fine of no less than 500 to 5000 Jordanian Dinars.

Ombudsman Bureau, legal aid centre to cooperate in addressing public complaints

AMMAN — The Ombudsman Bureau (OB) on Tuesday signed a memorandum of understanding (MoU) with the Justice Centre for Legal Aid (JCLA) to enhance the legal services both entities extend to the public.

The memorandum stipulates that the bureau will refer all grievances lodged by citizens that lie outside its jurisdiction to the JCLA which will provide legal advice to the complainants and guide them to the proper legal channels to seek justice, OB President Abdul Ilah Kurdi said yesterday on the sidelines of the signing ceremony.

“The OB receives hundreds of complaints from citizens seeking the bureau’s assistance; however, a large number of those grievances are beyond our jurisdiction for different reasons such as being under the auspices of the judiciary. Under the agreement, we will send those grievances to the JCLA, where they will be handled by their staff,” Kurdi said, adding that the agreement will save the OB time and effort that used to be spent sorting out complaints.

He added that the MoU will encourage citizens to come forward with complaints, knowing that their grievances will not be ignored, but will be sent to a specialised entity to address them.

JCLA CEO Salah Bashir, who signed the MoU with Kurdi on behalf of their respective institutions, said the OB represents the conscience of the public sector.

“It is of great importance for people to know that there are institutions defending their rights. We at the JCLA work with other government and private sector institutions to ensure that citizens can have access to justice when their rights are violated,” Bashir, a former justice minister, said.

He added that the JCLA, which was established in July 2008 as a nonprofit NGO, has been working to provide legal aid services to the underprivileged, adding that their mission is to legally empower communities through the use of legal counselling, representation and the promotion of awareness.

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